June 2021
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June 2021
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June 2021
Volume 1, Number 4
Inside
trailer
Reimagining Towable Design
Keystone RV developed a proprietary chassis for its Arcadia — then gave the new fifth wheel and travel trailer brand a unique forward-leaning shape to go with it.
RV examination
Prepping for Peace of Mind
Campers Inn RV’s new Quality Center in Elkhart County, Indiana, puts RVs through an extensive examination long before they head off to dealership locations.
plumbing pipe
PEX Makes it Possible
Plumbing technology has advanced significantly for RVs. Modern materials make it easier to repair plumbing problems while on the road.
man working on RV
Holding Tank Care & Maintenance
Dealing with holding tanks will never rank high on an RVer’s popularity chart, but neither do they have to be the nastiest part of RVing.
shower head on
Shower for Hours
Two gripes most travelers have when showering in an RV are water pressure and hard water. Here’s one way to deal with both aggravations.
toilet paper
The Great Wipe-Off
Toilet paper is at the center of many black-water tank problems, so we tested and ranked 9 popular RV toilet tissue brands to find what works best.
Departments
Tesla Cybertruck with a camper
Jayco Brands offer a free year of Togo RV Plus, The Tesla Cybertruck gets a camper, Fleetwood RV debuts the new Frontier — and more.
woman cooking with a crock pot
Just because you’re traveling doesn’t mean you can’t eat well. The Instant Pot is creating legions of fans for its ease and versatility.
lightning
RVers often encounter severe weather while traveling during the summer months. Here’s what you need to know to stay safe.
boat dock
Often overlooked by visitors to South Carolina’s more popular destinations, Georgetown is steeped in history.
June 2021 cover
Brandon Turner, service manager at Tim’s RV in Erving, Mass., makes a quick repair to the lines feeding a water heater using PEX plumbing and fittings. Photo by Chris Dougherty.
Inside
Special Section!
How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
RV towing a car
Choosing a Dinghy Vehicle
Towing a car, truck or SUV behind your motorhome makes travel more convenient and enjoyable — but not every vehicle can be flat-towed.
using a drill
A Strong Base
Towing a vehicle requires a hard connection between the motorhome and dinghy. The base plate is the first thing to add; here’s how to find and install one.
wiring
Lights, Signals, Action!
There’s more to towing a vehicle behind a coach than hard connections — the dinghy’s electrical system also has to be modified for safe, legal travel.
hands adjusting wiring
Safe Stop
A dinghy can tax a motorhome’s stopping power, which is why a supplementary braking system for the towed vehicle is mandatory in all but one state.
RV towing a car
Dinghy Accessories
A handy guide to discussing potential issues RVers may be confronted with when towing a vehicle behind a motorhome — and how to solve them.
EDITORIAL STAFF
PUBLISHER – Bob Livingston
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TECHNICAL EDITOR – Chris Hemer
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CORRESPONDENCE
Correspondence is invited from subscribers and readers of RV Enthusiast. Technical inquiries relating to RV function, maintenance, repairs and/or upgrades should be directed to either Technical Director Chris Dougherty or Technical Editor Chris Hemer at the above email addresses. Letters to the Editor should be directed to Editor Bruce Hampson at the above email address. Personal replies cannot be sent due to the volume of mail received. By forwarding letters to RV Enthusiast magazine, the author consents to allow letters to be published at the discretion of RV Enthusiast editors. Letters may be edited for brevity and clarification.

RV Enthusiast is published monthly by RVE Media Group Inc., 3425 East Golden Valley Road, Reno, NV 89506. RV Enthusiast magazine is copyrighted in the United States, Canada, Great Britain and other countries.© 2021 RVE Media Group All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts considered on an individual basis and granted only by written request. Advertising rates and Editorial calendars provided upon request at https://rventhusiast.com/advertise. Opinions expressed in RV Enthusiast are those of the author and not necessarily those of RVE Media Group LLC. Be sure to further research any product, service, or project seen in RVE before installing on your RV. Always use safe working practices, and if you’re not comfortable, consult an RV service professional.

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© 2021. AquaMax is a trademark, and Thetford/Thetford [Logo] are registered trademarks of Thetford Corporation. All Right Reserved. Made in the USA.
On The Road
By Bruce Hampson
You Never Know What’s Going to Happen While on the Road
A blown-out tire with frayed edges around the hole
I

t was supposed to be a trip destined to make memories. Granted, all journeys oftentimes lend themselves to creating stories for one’s personal memoirs, but this one was special: It was to celebrate not only the 50th anniversary of Bob and Lynne Livingston’s marriage but also Bob’s 50th year in the RV industry.

To say it hasn’t worked out quite the way it was envisioned would be something of an understatement.

Let me preface this by saying that Bob is easily one of the most technically knowledgeable journalists on the planet. For decades he oversaw the nuts-and-bolts story lines that appeared in both Trailer Life and MotorHome magazines and authored Trailer Life’s RV Repair & Maintenance Manual which, when printed and for years afterward, was considered the authority on RV repair for the do-it-yourself crowd. He’s also one of four experienced RV journalists who came together to create RV Enthusiast magazine. Suffice to say, he knows his stuff.

News & Notes
Jayco Brands Offer Free Year of Togo RV Plus
Togo RV app on two plays
Togo RV, a multifaceted app and savings program that bills itself as “the ultimate RV companion,” has partnered with Jayco to announce the launch of the Togo RV First Year Free program. The arrangement provides purchasers of new Jayco RVs — including those from subsidiaries Entegra Coach, Highland Ridge RV and Starcraft RV — with a complementary one-year membership to Togo’s Togo RV Plus catalog of benefits.

The extensive Togo RV Plus program provides members with the list of features available at no cost to anyone using its Togo Free program as well as a host of valuable additions. The upscale program, available for $39.99 annually, includes GPS navigation customized for your RV; a 25% lifetime discount on Harvest Hosts’ popular annual membership; premium trip planning with Roadtrippers Plus; unlimited access to boondocking locations using OvernightRVParking.com; major savings on favorite RV brands, tires and more. It also offers gold-status membership to RVillage, one of the RV industry’s top social networks.

SuperSprings International
No more strapping everything down
like you’re expecting an earthquake.
No more strapping everything down like you’re expecting an earthquake.
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Trailer SumoSprings
Airless air springs that are manufactured from our micro-cellular polyurethane and engineered to remove sway, hop, and vibration.

This results in an entirely different driving experience when you’re towing your moving house. More control. More comfort. More vacation.

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Journey Better
THE CULINARY CAMPER
By Bruce Hampson / Photos by Bob Livingston
Multicookers are On the Move — Literally
The versatility of an Instant Pot delivers home-cooked meals no matter where you camp
Woman using a multicooker
I

remember one of my first staff RV outings when I was overseeing the editorial content of MotorHome magazine many years back. Those of us who could go — as well as a few friends and family members — spent a long weekend at Pismo Coast Village, one of a number of campgrounds along the California coast just south of San Luis Obispo. I don’t recall the RV I used for the weekend, other than it was a hybrid travel trailer that I shared with my son and two of his friends.

What I do recollect, however, was how my publisher laughed when he entered the trailer and saw me cooking breakfast in an electric skillet. This, apparently, wasn’t “roughing it,” although I had the last laugh: when we weren’t barbequing, I cooked everything in that skillet, to no complaints. As a bachelor, I’d developed a decent repertoire of one-pot (or one-skillet) meals — and one-pot cleanups.

THE WEATHER STATION
Lightening strike touching ground
A double cloud-to-ground lightning strike at Duxbury Beach, Mass., on July 2, 2004. Photo courtesy Jesse Rudavsky.
RVing in Severe Weather
What You Need to Know to Stay Safe
By Glenn Field and Frank Nocera

People who spend a lot of time outdoors — like those who are reading this article — should be well aware of the hazards that dangerous weather can bring. This is especially important in certain parts of the country, but during the summer the weather can change quickly across much of the country. We wanted to take this opportunity to give an overview of the National Weather Service’s (NWS) products and services and to give some information on lightning safety.

Lightening strike touching ground
A double cloud-to-ground lightning strike at Duxbury Beach, Mass., on July 2, 2004. Photo courtesy Jesse Rudavsky.

First, let’s provide a few critical definitions:

Thunderstorm — A cumulonimbus cloud that becomes electrically charged and produces lightning. Lightning quickly heats the air around it to 50,000 degrees which causes a rapid expansion of that air. Thunder is the sound we hear due to that expansion.

Severe Thunderstorm — A thunderstorm that produces either a wind gust in excess of 58 mph or hail that is 1” in diameter (size of a quarter) or larger, or both. Severe thunderstorms can occasionally spawn a tornado.

‘Reimagining’ Towable RV Design
From its unique front cap design to its patented chassis, Keystone RV’s Arcadia may help redefine fifth wheels and travel trailers
By Bruce Hampson
R

V construction — the actual building of an RV as opposed to the perceived quality of that build — doesn’t typically crop up in conversations around the campfire. There’s a good reason why: Much of an RV’s requisite systems are hidden from sight behind wallboards, ceilings, floors and underbelly protection. Owners enjoy the final results, from entertainment centers and onboard electronics to sinks, showers and toilets without having to deal with the constraints manufacturers encountered while installing such systems.

Keystone RV President Jeff Runels (left) and Arcadia Product Manager Dustin Tavernier inside the new Arcadia fifth wheel
Keystone RV President Jeff Runels (left) and Arcadia Product Manager Dustin Tavernier inside the new Arcadia fifth wheel, which features a “farmhouse” interior with plenty of residential features.
As many RV techs can attest, however, when units are brought in for servicing even seemingly minor repairs and upgrades can become drawn-out affairs. The oftentimes bewildering nests of pipes and wiring demanded by onboard safety and comfort systems tend to follow routes dictated by the RV’s framework — a situation that can, on occasion, tax the abilities of even the most experienced service shop.
Choosing a Dinghy Vehicle
Finding the right car, truck or SUV to tow behind your motorhome will make travel more convenient and enjoyable
By Chris Hemer
How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
B

ringing a dinghy (or “towed”) vehicle along for your motorhome journeys is a popular practice among RVers — and one that can make traveling much more convenient when you arrive at your destination. Once you’re all set up with the motorhome’s awning out and the jacks down, it’s simply a matter of jumping in your dinghy vehicle when you want to explore the surroundings or visit friends and family. Plus, there are no concerns over where or how you might park when you get there, which reduces stress and provides greater freedom for your travel plans.

While the process of towing a vehicle with all four of its wheels on the ground isn’t difficult, choosing the right dinghy vehicle for your needs requires some research and planning on your part to make sure the vehicle you own — or wish to purchase — is suitable for dinghy towing.

Since your motorhome will be doing all of the heavy lifting, the first step is to verify its tow rating. A large gas or diesel Class A may not have difficulty towing most vehicles but a smaller Class C may have a limited tow rating, so be sure to check with the chassis or coach manufacturer first. The weight of the dinghy vehicle you are considering, meanwhile, should be available on the vehicle manufacturer’s website under “specifications.”

A Strong Base
The baseplate is the first thing you’ll need after you choose a dinghy vehicle. Here’s how to find and install one
By Chris Hemer
photos by the author
O

nce you have verified that the vehicle you plan to tow behind your motorhome is, in fact, towable, the first step toward outfitting it for dinghy duty is the base plate. Unlike a travel trailer — which was designed to be attached behind another vehicle — a car, truck or SUV was never intended to be towed for recreational purposes. So, the baseplate serves as the attachment point for a tow bar, which is most connected to the motorhome via its hitch receiver when you’re ready to tow.

How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
A Strong Base
The baseplate is the first thing you’ll need after you choose a dinghy vehicle. Here’s how to find and install one
By Chris Hemer
photos by the author
mechanic using a drill
How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
O

nce you have verified that the vehicle you plan to tow behind your motorhome is, in fact, towable, the first step toward outfitting it for dinghy duty is the base plate. Unlike a travel trailer — which was designed to be attached behind another vehicle — a car, truck or SUV was never intended to be towed for recreational purposes. So, the baseplate serves as the attachment point for a tow bar, which is most connected to the motorhome via its hitch receiver when you’re ready to tow.

Technically speaking, a base plate isn’t a “plate” at all, but a carefully engineered steel structure that attaches to the vehicle’s frame and/or bumper brackets to distribute the load of towing and braking evenly. Because baseplates are application-specific, the leading manufacturers all offer fit lists for their base plates; you can simply go to their websites and enter the make, model and year of the vehicle in question to find out if there is a baseplate available for it (see sidebar).
Lights,
Signals,
Action!
There are a number of good ways to modify a vehicle’s electrical system so that it can be towed behind a motorhome safely and legally
By Chris Hemer / photos by author
How to Tow Anything! Logo
Lights, Signals, Action!
There are a number of good ways to modify a vehicle’s electrical system so that it can be towed behind a motorhome safely and legally
By Chris Hemer / photos by author
Wiring Cables with gloves
How to Tow Anything! Logo
W

hen planning to tow a vehicle behind a motorhome, keep in mind that you’re essentially turning it into a trailer as far as the law is concerned. It must have an emergency breakaway, its own functioning brake system and lights that work in concert with tow vehicle (in this case, your motorhome) so that drivers behind your dinghy vehicle know when you’re braking, turning, or just have the running lights on.

Unlike a trailer, which already has a wiring harness designed to plug into the tow vehicle (seven or four pin), a car, truck or SUV does not — the electrical system in the dinghy vehicle must be modified so that can be plugged into the motorhome’s electrical system when it’s time to tow. This same harness may also be used to operate a supplemental braking system and/or to keep the dinghy vehicle’s battery charged with the addition of a charge line (more on that later).

Safe
Stop
Adding a supplementary braking system for secure, reliable and legal dinghy towing
By Chris Hemer
How to Tow Anything! Logo
Safe Stop
Adding a supplementary braking system for secure, reliable and legal dinghy towing
By Chris Hemer
Man handling wires
How to Tow Anything! Logo
P

art of an enjoyable, relaxing motorhome journey is being safe in the knowledge that everything is working correctly and you’re ready for just about any eventuality. Having a properly functioning supplementary braking system on the dinghy vehicle should be a big part of your travel preparedness. Unlike a trailer, which has its own dedicated brake system that is energized whenever you plug the power cord into the tow vehicle, your dinghy vehicle’s brakes won’t work unless you install a supplementary system that applies the brakes when the motorhome brakes are applied. There are two basic ways to do this: with a portable system that locates between the vehicle’s driver seat and brake pedal, or a permanently installed system — and there are a variety of choices available. Which do you choose? And perhaps more importantly, are supplementary brakes really necessary?

In a word, “yes.” While it may be true that most motorhomes are capable of stopping with a dinghy vehicle in tow, the question is, how much will braking distance be increased? Obviously, this depends on the motorhome and the weight of the dinghy vehicle in question — but there’s no doubt that you will appreciate all the braking power you can get when you’re heading downhill at 60mph and traffic begins to slow suddenly. Plus, a supplementary braking system will take some of the burden off of your motorhome’s brakes, helping to prevent dreaded brake fade and improving brake life.

Dinghy Accessories
Handy products that solve both common and uncommon problems while towing
By Chris Hemer
How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
Dinghy Accessories
Handy products that solve both common and uncommon problems while towing
By Chris Hemer
How to Tow Anything! Part 2 - Motorized
E

lsewhere in this section, we’ve covered the key components you must have in order to tow a dinghy vehicle safely and legally: A baseplate, tow bar, supplementary braking system and modifications to the vehicle’s electrical system. But beyond these must-haves, there is a wide range of accessories available that are designed to make towing your dinghy vehicle more convenient and enjoyable.

Newer vehicles, in particular, require an increasing number of steps to prepare them for towing, most of which involve extra time and can result in some real hassles. For example, many new vehicle owner’s manuals specify that the negative battery cable be disconnected every time you tow, which means that all of your data (time/date, radio presets, etc.) will need to be re-set once you arrive at your destination. In addition, a battery that is disconnected can’t power up a portable braking system, which can create another set of problems. In other cases, the manufacturer may specify that certain fuses be removed before towing — and you can just imagine the fun of breaking or losing the fuses for your vehicle when you’re miles away from anywhere on a Sunday afternoon.

Prepping for Peace of Mind
Campers Inn RV established a PDI Quality Center in the heart of the RV world — Elkhart County, Indiana — to allow the retailer’s individual dealership service departments to focus on warranty and retail repairs
By Bruce Hampson
Photos by the author
A

s anyone who owns an RV knows, the pandemic that fueled a rediscovery of the camping lifestyle has also intensified a few shortcomings that have plagued the industry for years. The inability of finding a last-minute site at a popular campground is one perennial angst chart-topper for weary travelers — and being able to locate a service shop that can provide emergency RV repairs is another. While dealers, suppliers and the industry itself are addressing a shortage of service technicians, most repair facilities nonetheless have an appointment schedule oftentimes stretching for months into the future.

a service technician at Campers Inn’s Quality Center
Dwayne Bailey, a service technician at Campers Inn’s Quality Center, goes through a checklist while examining appliances inside a travel trailer at the Goshen, Indiana, facility.
Most RVers, though, don’t understand all the reasons for this. While there’s no overlooking the impact that hundreds of thousands of new RVs have made on the repair chain, many dealers also have implemented their own extensive PDI — pre-delivery inspection — processes as a means to catch and correct any oversight made during the manufacturing process. Done correctly, a thorough PDI can require as much as three or four hours per unit, an effort that can tax even fully staffed service centers.
Pipes stacked
PEX Makes it Possible
Modern materials make it easier to fix your RV’s plumbing on the road
By Chris Dougherty
T

he modern amenities we enjoy in today’s RVs almost always follow the trends found in residential applications, from design aesthetics to electronics and, yes, plumbing. During the past 100 years, plumbing technology in RVs has progressed from using copper and galvanized pipe and tanks to today’s cross-linked polyethylene, or PEX, plumbing, residential style fixtures and instant, on-demand, endless hot water.

RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks logo
Pipes stacked
PEX Makes it Possible
Modern materials make it easier to fix your RV’s plumbing on the road
By Chris Dougherty
PEX plumbing fix
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks logo
T

he modern amenities we enjoy in today’s RVs almost always follow the trends found in residential applications, from design aesthetics to electronics and, yes, plumbing. During the past 100 years, plumbing technology in RVs has progressed from using copper and galvanized pipe and tanks to today’s cross-linked polyethylene, or PEX, plumbing, residential style fixtures and instant, on-demand, endless hot water.

Fortunately, the water systems in RVs are still pretty simple for the most part. Higher-end motorhomes and some fifth-wheels add complexity in the form of manifolds, pressurized or macerating toilets, dishwashers and clothes washers. However, the basics of system care, maintenance and repair remain the same.

In this article, we’re presenting information about the freshwater plumbing system. We’ll delve into the waste system in a later issue.

Holding Tank Care and Maintenance
Dealing with holding tanks doesn’t have to be the nastiest part of RVing
By Chris Doughtery
H

aving grown up with RVing from the early 1970’s, I never experienced many RV potty problems. Basic mechanics, a farm upbringing and science got me through quite well. It wasn’t until I started working as a technician that I realized what a problem there was with all this crap (pun absolutely intended). As it turns out, when you take folks who have known nothing but a flush toilet, add any kind of paper that the TV commercials say is “soft and strong” and introduce them to a system they have to interact with…well, you have a potential problem.

RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks logo
Holding Tank Care and Maintenance
Dealing with holding tanks doesn’t have to be the nastiest part of RVing
By Chris Doughtery
Holding Tank Care and Maintenance
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks logo
H

aving grown up with RVing from the early 1970’s, I never experienced many RV potty problems. Basic mechanics, a farm upbringing and science got me through quite well. It wasn’t until I started working as a technician that I realized what a problem there was with all this crap (pun absolutely intended). As it turns out, when you take folks who have known nothing but a flush toilet, add any kind of paper that the TV commercials say is “soft and strong” and introduce them to a system they have to interact with…well, you have a potential problem.

In truth, holding tanks and gravity toilets in RVs are both a blessing and a curse. Dealing with them is arguably the least-favorite part of RVing, but if you follow a good process, use the right products and enough water, you’ll find that this chore will become relatively painless — and ecologically friendly.

The System
For people who are new to the lifestyle — and to serve as a review for the folks who have been around it for a while — wastewater in an RV is generally separated into liquid waste (grey water) and a mix of solid and liquid waste (black water). Most of the time, sinks, showers, clothes washers and dishwashers drain into one or more grey water tanks in the RV via 1-½ inch black ABS pipe. Occasionally, systems in small RVs will have a single tank to capture black and grey water, but this is rare and frankly a less than ideal setup. Imagine the shower drain backing up because the single holding tank is full. Not a pretty picture.

Shower for Hours
Ecocamel’s Orbit showerhead promises a strong stream of water while reducing consumption and adding a softening feature
By Chris Hemer / Photos by the author
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks
Shower for Hours
Ecocamel’s Orbit showerhead promises a strong stream of water while reducing consumption and adding a softening feature
By Chris Hemer / Photos by the author
shower head on
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks
T

aking a shower in an RV is not exactly exotic. Most showerheads push out a boring stream of water, designed to get the job done with little fanfare. Multiple showerheads or a rainforest fixture can up the entertainment factor appreciably but adding such hardware may not be possible without major modifications to your rig. And even if the accoutrements in your shower invite lingering, water consumption plays a pivotal role — and don’t forget the limitations on hot water capacity (unless, of course, you have an instantaneous model like Truma’s AquaGo). Ecocamel, though, offers a number of products that restore luxury to showering in RVs.

The London, England-based company’s most interesting product is the Orbit SoftWater, a showerhead that combines a unique soft-water feature with multiple spray nozzles in a ring-shaped head. While it’s nice to have a strong stream of water that covers the body while showering, the soft-water portion targets a common problem for RVers: calcium damage introduced by hard water that can build up in water lines.

The Great Wipe Off!
Comparison tests of popular — and some lesser-known — toilet paper brands reveal that not all products are created equal, but they are pretty close
By Bob Livingston / Photos by author
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks
All the toilet tissue used in the test. There are many choices on the market, but this test focused on the most common brands found in RV stores and online. Nature’s Call (bamboo), Nature Pure and Better Boat are not familiar names to most RVers but can be found online.
R

V owners have a love-hate relationship with their holding tanks. Usually, the most problematic of these is the black tank — a waste receptacle which can clog, create havoc with the monitor sensors and (as we’ve probably all discovered on occasion) emit terrible odors. If you’re looking for answers to why these tanks cause so much pain, just look in the mirror. Owners are known to neglect regular maintenance, introduce the wrong type of toilet paper — and use too much of it — fail to add proper chemicals and follow erroneous dumping procedures. The Internet is full of reasons why these tanks create stress among owners, but many of the “solutions” are technically inaccurate and will themselves lead to additional problems.

stack of different toilet paper brands
All the toilet tissue used in the test. There are many choices on the market, but this test focused on the most common brands found in RV stores and online. Nature’s Call (bamboo), Nature Pure and Better Boat are not familiar names to most RVers but can be found online.
RV Plumbing Tips and Tricks
R

V owners have a love-hate relationship with their holding tanks. Usually, the most problematic of these is the black tank — a waste receptacle which can clog, create havoc with the monitor sensors and (as we’ve probably all discovered on occasion) emit terrible odors. If you’re looking for answers to why these tanks cause so much pain, just look in the mirror. Owners are known to neglect regular maintenance, introduce the wrong type of toilet paper — and use too much of it — fail to add proper chemicals and follow erroneous dumping procedures. The Internet is full of reasons why these tanks create stress among owners, but many of the “solutions” are technically inaccurate and will themselves lead to additional problems.

Until bidets become commonplace in RVs, most of us will continue to use toilet paper for personal hygiene. And although toilet paper for stationary homes is bountiful (sans pandemic hoarding), RVers must use products specifically designed to break down in the holding tank. While the famous bears in television ads love to use soft toilet paper on their tender tushies, RVs have different parameters.

Hence, The Great Wipeoff, wherein yours truly and three companion RVers “took one for the team” by overeating for a few days in order to fully assess the abilities of a variety of tissue types meant to keep us happy while on the road.

New Stuff
Hose-Grip
Get a Grip!
Sometimes, little things take on an oversize importance — like trying to attach a freshwater hose between your RV and the campsite water spigot. The solution? The folks at J. Wright Concepts developed the Hose-Grip, an 8-inch assembly that attaches easily to any RV water hose. The ergonomic design of the Grip makes attaching and removal of the hose at the faucet a breeze for anyone with limited hand dexterity. The Grip features nickel-plated male and female fittings combined with a hydraulically crimped Water Right polyurethane hose with a burst pressure of more than 300 psi, exceeding virtually all pressure standards you might find in your travels. There also are 3- and 6-foot versions available, which work great for customers who use an inline water filter. J Wright Concepts, (916) 955-0048, https://rvcablegrip.com
Making Memories
By Sue Strauss photos by author
Cruising Through Scenic South Carolina
Often overlooked by visitors to more popular destinations nearby, Georgetown is steeped in history and offers a wealth of coastal wildlife viewing.
view of the Harborwalk Marina
The Harborwalk Marina is located on the Sampit River in the heart of downtown Georgetown. Step off the docks and onto Front Street, which has numerous restaurants, bars, art galleries, gift shops and more.
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few years ago, while traveling through South Carolina, my husband and I discovered what USA Today named in 2018 “America’s Best Coastal Small Town” — Georgetown, South Carolina. Georgetown is located in the center of South Carolina’s beautiful Hammock Coast and is just one hour north of Charleston and 30 minutes south of Myrtle Beach on Highway 17. This small coastal town has more 200-year-old homes than Charleston along with scenic plantations, a rich history and lots of Southern charm — and it has none of the crowds that you find in Charleston or Myrtle Beach.

Recognized as the third-oldest city in the United States, Georgetown is located on Winyah Bay and is at the convergence of five rivers: the Black River, Small Pee Dee and Great Pee Dee rivers, and the Waccamaw and Sampit rivers. The earliest residents of the Georgetown area were Native American tribes, which are responsible for many of the names of the rivers and natural features around this region. In the 1520s, European explorers from Spain discovered this seaport area, later followed by English and French settlements along the five rivers. The city of Georgetown was officially established as a “trading post” and seaport in 1729 (it is, today, the second-largest seaport in South Carolina). As trade with the Native American tribes declined, residents developed large plantations and cultivated indigo and rice. By the mid-1700s, Georgetown exported more rice than any port in the world.

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